Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Observing and Questioning: August 31, 2016

Focus: How can simple observations and questions lead to discoveries?

1. Warming up with a little scientific inspiration on the importance of simple observations and questions; writing a take-away/motto for today on your dry erase tape

2. Looking over your research so far; at the top of your annotated bibliography, try the following:

a. Make a few simple observations regarding your topic/research that you think are important.
  • As Y2K approached, people were quick to panic.
  • Many assumed that a technical glitch would essentially lead to the end of civilized life.
  • People hoarded goods, build underground shelters, and prepared for the new millennium as though preparing for a natural disaster or a war.

b. Based on your observations, ask a Level 3 question that you hope to answer as you dive into your research. Put it in bold font at the top.

Remember: A Level 3 question has many possible answers and can be applied to many situations.
  • Ex: Why is paranoia contagious?
  • Ex: What is the link between reliance on technology and mass panic?

3. Working on your annotated bibliographies; let your Level 3 question guide your research
  • Click here for an overview of the what/why/how of the annotated bibliography.
  • Click here for a sample with formatting help.

HW:
1. Please finish your annotated bibliography before class tomorrow (Thursday, Sep 1).

2. If it's in your budget or on your bookshelf, please acquire your own copy of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.

3. BRING IN STICKY NOTES. We shall hoard them like they're going out of style.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Researching Professionally and Productively: August 30, 2016

Focus: How do we productively tinker with research?

Slightly shortened class today due to TRIBE. Also, tomorrow is a PLC day.

1. Warming up with a quick survey about your current routines as a writer

2. Looking over yesterday's takeaways from Tinkering School and writing a short manifesto that encourages you as a writer

Ex: "Embrace the mess."

3. Sharing a routine with you that's part of every professional writer's life: the annotated bibliography; giving you time to continue gathering websites and to thinking through them using the annotated bibliography
  • Click here for an overview of the what/why/how of the annotated bibliography.
  • Click here for a sample with formatting help.
4. Giving you time to explore, research, figure things out, fail, learn, etc

HW:
1. Please finish your annotated bibliography before class on Thursday, September 1. Make sure it's in your cultural hysteria folder. Minimum # of entries: 5.

2. If it's in your budget or on your bookshelf, please acquire your own copy of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.

3. BRING IN STICKY NOTES. We shall hoard them like they're going out of style.


Monday, August 29, 2016

Tinkering with Ideas, Questions, and Research: August 29, 2016

Focus: How do we develop writing routines to keep messy learning productive?

1. Warming up with inspiration from the Tinkering School; post on today's class blog one takeaway

"Success is in the doing, and failures are celebrated and analyzed. Problems become puzzles, and obstacles disappear." -- Gever Tulley

2. Generating questions about your research topic on sticky notes:
  • What are curious about? What do you want to know?
  • What are you wondering?
  • What's confusing?
  • What do you need to find out more about?
  • What are some connections you're hoping to make?
  • What do you hope to learn by the end of this project?
  • What audiences might be interesting in your findings? Who else (besides your teacher) might want to read your writing?
3. Clustering and coding your questions to focus your research; form a Google doc for your questions and sources

Click HERE for the project overview if you start losing sight of what this project is.

4. Researching your topic professionally to find answers for your questions
  • Where should we look for quality research?
  • How do we know if a website is reliable? Are you familiar the C.R.A.P. test?
  • Try listing websites underneath the questions they answer.
5. Starting to develop an annotated bibliography to gather and assess research
  • Click here for an overview of the what/why/how of the annotated bibliography
  • Click here for a sample with formatting help

HW:
1. Continue working on answering your sticky note questions by researching and keeping an annotated bibliography; the window for this step is August 29-Sep 1.

4th hour sign-up

6th hour sign-up

2. If it's in your budget or on your bookshelf, please acquire your own copy of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.

3. BRING IN STICKY NOTES. We shall hoard them like they're going out of style.


Thursday, August 25, 2016

Brainstorming Ideas about Cultural Hysteria: August 26, 2016

Focus: How do generate ideas about cultural hysteria?

1. Exploring a Puritan Primer (school book)

a. Read through the lessons together and discuss what strikes you and/or what this primer reveals about Puritan life.

b. Create a 6-line found poem that brings together this primer and your articles.
  • Use one line/phrase from the primer for your title.
  • Select 4 more lines/phrases from the primer and arrange them poetically.
  • Pick a shift word, like "however," "meanwhile," "but," "yet," "nonetheless," etc.
  • Conclude with 2 lines/phrases from your article(s).

2. Comparing ideas about modern cultural hysterias in jigsaw discussions:
  • Summarize the key points from your articles.
  • What do your articles have in common with the Salem witch trials?
  • What do your articles have in common with each other?
  • How would, as a group, define the term "cultural hysteria"? Please have one of you post your definition on today's class blog. Extra challenge: Can you work one of the 10 Puritan words from vocab.com into your definition?

3. Friday Freewrite #1:

What is a hysteria that you have been caught up in since you’ve been alive? Describe it briefly for people (context, theory, etc.)Tell me how it made you feel at the time it was most hysterical--how did it change you at the time, etc. What allowed its resolution in your mind? What you learned from it going forward?

AND/OR

What Americans fear the most? What do we do to feel safe?

AND/OR

What do you, personally, fear the most? What do you do to feel safe?

HW: 
1. If you have not yet done so, please pick a topic for your cultural hysteria research project and enter it on your class document below. Read over others' topics before posting yours; if possible, I prefer that no two members from the same hour have the exact same topic.

4th hour sign-up

6th hour sign-up

2. If it's in your budget or on your bookshelf, please acquire your own copy of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.

3. BRING IN STICKY NOTES. We shall hoard them like they're going out of style.

Connecting the Past to the Present: August 25

Focus: What do Americans fear, and what do we do to feel safe?

1. Warming up with "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"; drawing the images that stay with you the most.

Enjoying a gallery walk of your art while searching for patterns

As a class, discussing the sermon's patterns: 

  • How would you characterize the relationship between God, humans, and the afterlife according to this Puritan sermon?
  • What do Puritans fear, and what do they do to feel safe?

2. Examining the project overview, linked here

3. Watching a news clip on the Le Roy High School outbreak; reading one of four articles on modern cultural hysteria

  • What does your article have in common with the Salem witch trials?
  • How would you, personally, define the term "cultural hysteria"?

Y2K
UFOs and War of the Worlds
Ebola and "Fear-bola"
Life after 9/11
Celebrity Death Hysteria

4. Comparing ideas in jigsaw discussions:

  • Summarize the key points from your articles.
  • What do your articles have in common with the Salem witch trials?
  • What do your articles have in common with each other?
  • How would, as a group, define the term "cultural hysteria"? Please have one of you post your definition on today's class blog. Extra challenge: Can you work one of the 10 Puritan words from vocab.com into your definition?


HW:
1. Start brainstorming a list of possible topics for your project; tomorrow, we will be signing up for them in class. If you're ready, you can sign up tonight by clicking on your class sign-up doc (linked below). It is first come, first served; I prefer that each member of the class explores a different topic.

4th hour sign-up

6th hour sign-up

2. One more night to complete the survey if you have not yet done so.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Examining Puritan Hysteria: August 24, 3016

Focus: What did the Puritans fear, and what did they do to feel safe?

1. Warming up with musical chairs (you need your target on your desk)

  • Round 1: Draw a picture of you as a Puritan. Include a thought bubble.
  • Round 2: Circle what you think is important/indispensable. Explain why it's important.
  • Round 3: Take a statement or a pattern and turn it into a question.


2. Forming groups of 3-4 based on shared phobias, such as fear of spiders, snakes, heights, etc.
  • Share, kids: What did people circle/comment on your target?
  • Discuss the three big questions from yesterday's Overview: Nightmare on Puritan Street; type your responses on the documents you copied into your "Cultural Hysteria" folders yesterday. 
  • Complete the collaboration self-evaluation linked HERE. Make a copy and place it inside your American Literature folder. Note: This grade is recorded but bears no weight on your final grade.
3. Listening to Jonathan Edwards' "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" and sketching the images that affect you the most

4. Enjoying a gallery walk of your images and a little freewriting:

Start a new doc inside your "Cultural Hysteria" folder called "Freewriting"
  • What did the Puritans fear, and what did they do to feel safe?
  • What do Americans fear the most today? What do we do to feel safe?
  • What do you, personally, fear? What do you do to feel safe?
Following up by sharing one sentence.

HW:
1. Have a look at the cultural hysteria project, linked HERE.

2. Have you filled out the survey yet? If not, please do so by Friday.


Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Investigating the Salem Witch Trials: August 23, 2016

Focus: What did the Puritans fear, and what did they do to feel safe?

1. Warming up with an impromptu performance of the Bridget Bishop trial in teams of 3: Judge, Bridget, and court clerk (the person who takes notes and POSTS THEM ON TODAY'S CLASS BLOG)
  • If you're Judge Hawthorne, what do you notice about the kinds of questions you're asking?
  • If you're Bridget Bishop, what do you notice about your responses?
  • Revisit yesterday's target. How do these court transcripts help you understand something new or support something you already discovered?

2. Solving the Salem witch trials:

a. Keeping the problem in mind, investigate the Salem witch trials individually using this overview and the other side of the target. (20 minutes) We'll take a look at a sample, too.


b. As a group, work towards a collaborative understanding of the Salem witch trials by sharing what you found at the core of your target.



***BRAIN BREAK***Make Google folders***Form groups of 3 or 4 with all members sharing a similar phobia (spiders, snakes, heights, etc).


c. In small groups, work towards solving the problem by developing thoughtful responses to the three big questions posed on the overview.


3. Wrapping up by posting one question about the Salem witch trials lurking in your brain


HW:

1. Before class tomorrow, please finish researching the Salem witch trials and filling in the target (all three circles).

2. If you have not yet completed the survey, please do so as soon as you can (this Friday at the latest).




Monday, August 22, 2016

Witch Hunting: August 22, 2016

Focus: Who were these Puritans, and what were they so afraid of?

Please turn in your signed course expectations and overview.

1. Warming up with a follow-up from Friday: How does last Friday's approach to vocabulary differ from traditional approaches to vocabulary? What skills did you need to do this activity?

Offering you access to a little more Puritan lingo from "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"
The problem: You're listening to a Puritan sermon. You don't know anything about Puritans. You don't even understand their language. They're not even alive anymore. How can you use their lingo to unlock their lives?


2. Testing the targets; trying them out as we view The Crucible film clips (11:50, 31:50, 1:15:30ish)

3. Solving the Salem witch trials:

a. Keeping the problem in mind, investigate the Salem witch trials individually using this overview and this target.

b. As a group, work towards a collaborative understanding of the Salem witch trials by sharing what you found at the core of your target.

c. In small groups, work towards solving the problem by developing thoughtful responses to the three big questions posed on the overview.

4. Wrapping up by posting one question about the Salem witch trials lurking in your brain

HW:
1. Before class tomorrow, please finish filling in your target if you did not finish in class. Don't worry about the three big questions on the overview yet if we didn't get to them in class.

2. If you have not yet completed the survey, please do so as soon as you can (this Friday at the latest).