Friday, September 30, 2016

Friday Freewrite: September 30, 2016

Focus: How can a one-word biography help you uncover a shift you've undergone?

4th hour: 9:54-10:40
6th hour: 12:06-12:55

1. Warming up with one-word descriptions of Oskar, the mom, the dad, the grandfather, and the grandmother

2. Friday freewriting: Click HERE for today's memoir slides.

HW:
1. Read pages 174-207 for next Tuesday in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; spend 30 minutes this week with your journal.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. 

2. We will continue our READING JOURNAL CONFERENCES in class next Monday and Wednesday. Click HERE for the rubric. 

3. TODAY IS THE FINAL DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING ANY WORK FROM THE LAST SIX WEEKS. 

Thursday, September 29, 2016

The Underworld: September 29, 2016

Focus: What does Oskar's trip to the Underworld teach us about his struggle?

1. Warming up a few thoughts on the low point of the hero's journey: Trip to the Underworld
  • Viewing a well-known heroic trip the Underworld/the Abyss (1:08:35)
    • What is the hero struggling with in this scene?
    • How might this scene represent a trip to the Underworld/the Abyss?
    • What does the hero have to do in order to make it out of the Underworld/the Abyss?
  • Flip through pages 142-173 and find one line that connects to the Underworld/the Abyss. 
    • Read these aloud in a quick whip-around.
    • What's Oskar really struggling with in this chapter?

2. Enjoying Fishbowl Discussion #3: Pages 142-173

3. Wrapping up with takeaways and reflections

HW:
1. Read pages 174-207 for next Tuesday in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; spend 30 minutes this week with your journal.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Fishbowl: Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. Socratic: Read over the syllabus and the class notes, then add an extended comment to the class blog.

2. BRING INDEX CARDS ON FRIDAY.

3. We will continue our READING JOURNAL CONFERENCES in class next Monday and Wednesday. Click HERE for the rubric. 

4. TOMORROW IS THE FINAL DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING ANY WORK FROM THE LAST SIX WEEKS. 

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Alas, Poor Yorick: September 28, 2016

Focus: Why does Foer include the play Hamlet in his novel? What does it help us understand about Oskar's role?

6th hour: Click HERE for the tentative sign-up (feel free to edit).

1. Warming up with a crash course on Hamlet

  • Read "Hamlet in a nutshell"
    • In your journal or in your ELIC Google folder, spend some time listing possible parallels (strong similarities) between the play Hamlet and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. In particular, what conflicts do Oskar and Hamlet share?
  • Read Act 5, scene 1 from Hamlet using No Fear Shakespeare (pages 8 and 9).
    • What's Hamlet struggling with in this scene?
    • How might his struggle relate to Oskar's struggle?
    • The beginning of your reading assignment tonight shows Oskar's mind going to a disturbing place. Keep in mind the depth of his struggles as you read this scene.

2. Optional: Watching the "Alas, poor Yorick" scene from the 1990 Hamlet (in the book, Oskar plays the role of the Yorick, the skull)

3. Reading and starting our journal conferences

HW:
1. Read pages 142-173 in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; spend 30 minutes this week with your journal.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Fishbowl: Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. Socratic: Read over the syllabus and the class notes, then add an extended comment to the class blog.

2. BRING INDEX CARDS ON FRIDAY.

3. We will continue our READING JOURNAL CONFERENCES in class next Monday and Wednesday. Click HERE for the rubric. 

4. THIS FRIDAY IS THE END OF 6 WEEKS. All make-up work from the first 6 weeks must be submitted by this date. After Friday, any grade in IC will remain as is.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Something and Nothing: September 27, 2016

Focus: What do we learn about how the grandparents define "Something" and "Nothing" ? 

Advisement: Slightly shortened class today

1. Warming up with a quick overview of the journal rubric

2. Delving into Thomas' narrative
  • Reading pages 108-111 and 132-136 together: 
    • (1) Pick out three lines that captures something important about the grandmother and grandfather's relationship
    • (2) Ask a question and/or make an inference about these lines. 
    • (3) Extra challenge: What won't they say to each other?
    • (4) Extra extra challenge: What do they mean by "Something" and "Nothing"? Why do they need "Something spaces" and "Nothing spaces"?
2. Enjoying Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close Discussion #2: Pages 86-141

3. Wrapping up with takeaways/reflections

HW:
1. Read pages 142-173 in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; spend 30 minutes this week with your journal.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Fishbowl: Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. Socratic: Read over the syllabus and the class notes, then add an extended comment to the class blog.

2. will begin our READING JOURNAL CONFERENCES in class tomorrow (Wednesday). Click HERE for the rubric. 

3. THIS FRIDAY IS THE END OF 6 WEEKS. All make-up work from the first 6 weeks must be submitted by this date. After Friday, any grade in IC will remain as is.

Monday, September 26, 2016

Looking Back So We Can Move Forward: September 26, 2016

Focus: What do we need to learn from last week in order to take a big step forward this week?

1. Warming up by clearing up your confusions:
  • 4th Hour: Click HERE for your questions
  • 6th Hour: Click HERE for your questions
  • Working with a partner to answer two of the questions.
  • Teaching the class what you've figured out.
2. Setting a reading goal based on Thursday's fishbowl discussion (or your discussions in general)

3. Reading and journalling; click HERE for the journal rubric

HW:
1. Read through page 141 for Tuesday (tomorrow). Leaders need to prepare a syllabus for Tuesday and post it on the class Google doc.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Fishbowl: Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. Socratic: Read over the syllabus and the class notes, then add an extended comment to the class blog.

2. Spend 30 minutes this week on your journal; bring your journal to class each day. We will start our reading journal conferences on Wednesday.

3. THIS FRIDAY IS THE END OF 6 WEEKS. All make-up work from the first 6 weeks must be submitted by this date. After Friday, any grade in IC will remain as is.

Friday, September 23, 2016

Friday Freewriting: September 23, 2016

Focus: What do artifacts reveal about their owners?

1. Warming up with dropping your Level 1 questions in the bucket and celebrating some of yesterday's successes

2. Getting into your writing space and investigating your artifacts; click HERE for the possibilities

3. Bringing it back to Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close:

  • Pick one of our narrators (Oskar, his grandfather, or his grandmother).
  • Make a list of the artifacts they collect.
  • What do these artifacts reveal about the character? What insight do they offer you to who this character is, how this character's mind works, what this character values, what this character fears, what this character loves, what this character lacks, what this character desires above all else?


HW:
1. Read through page 141 for Tuesday. Leaders need to prepare a syllabus for Tuesday and post it on the class Google doc.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Fishbowl: Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. Socratic: Read over the syllabus and the class notes, then add an extended comment to the class blog.

2. Spend 30 minutes this week on your journal; bring your journal to class each day. We will start our reading journal conferences on Wednesday.

3. If you don't feel like waiting another week or two to get your essay back, come on in for a conference (no sign-up necessary). We'll grade it on the spot, and it won't be scary.

4. NEXT FRIDAY IS THE END OF 6 WEEKS. All make-up work from the first 6 weeks must be submitted by this date. After Friday, any grade in IC will remain as is.



Thursday, September 22, 2016

A 9-Year-Old's Hero's Journey: September 22, 2016

Focus: What is the nature of Oskar's journey?

Need a bookmark? Coming your way soon!

1. Warming up with Star Wars According a 3-Year-Old; mapping out the Joseph Campbell hero's journey as a class

"Here it is: there's only one story. There, I said it and I can't very will take it back. There is only one story. Ever. One. It's always been going on and it's everywhere around us and every story you've ever read or heard or watched is part of it." 

-- Foster, How To Read Literature Like a Professor

2. Trying out Campbell's hero's journey with your favorite quests, then using the hero's journey to understand the start of Oskar's quest

3. Discussion #1: Pages 35-85 of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

4. Reflecting on your role in discussion today

HW:
1. Read through page 141 in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close for Tuesday's discussion; leaders need to prepare a syllabus. 

2. Remember to spend 30 minutes on your journal for this book throughout the week; starting next week, I will conference with each of you during class on your journals.

3. First memoir assignment: Next Friday (TOMORROW), bring in a collection of items that have significance to you (ticket stubs, printed photos, hospital ID bracelet, etc.).








Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Oskar and the Falling Man: September 21, 2016

Focus: What is the significance of "The Falling Man," both to our history and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close?

1. Warming up with Oskar's interest in The Falling Man (5 minutes)
  • Describe what you're seeing on pages 59 and 62 / your gut reaction to this image.
  • Why do you think Oskar is so interested in this image?
  • What has fallen/is falling in this novel so far?
2. Viewing the intellectual debate over the photo (24:50-33:00; 1:08:18-end); discussing your thoughts in small groups

3. Reading and journalling pages 35-85 in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close with a few reminders about reading time

Tomorrow's leaders may use this time to create their syllabus.


HW:
1. Bring your journal to class each day.

2. First reading assignment: Extremely Loud and Incredibly ClosePages 35-85 for THURSDAY. You will have 30 minutes on Monday and 30 minutes on Wednesday to read. Like hearing the book out loud? Click HERE to hear it on audiobook.com (first book is free).

3. First memoir assignment: Next Friday (Sep 23), bring in a collection of items that have significance to you (ticket stubs, printed photos, hospital ID bracelet, etc.).




Tuesday, September 20, 2016

The Falling Man: September 20, 2016

Focus: What is the significance of the falling man?

Do you have a journal yet?

1. Warming up with two quick housekeeping items:
  • Now that you have finished your first essay for this class, please take the following survey: Writing Routines, Take 2
  • Want help staying on top of your work? Join Remind and get text reminders from me every now and then.
    • 4th hour: Click HERE to join Remind (or see e-mail).
    • 6th hour: Click HERE to join Remind (or see e-mail).
  • Sign up for Fishbowl and Socratic dates!
    • 4th hour: You must be a leader once and a discusser once (and they can't happen on the same day). Click HERE for a detailed overview of Fishbowl.
    • 6th hour: You must be a leader once and an observer once (and they can't happen on the same day). Click HERE for a detailed overview of Socratic.

2. Freewriting on pages 59 and 62 of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close: 
  • Describe what you're seeing.
  • Why do you think Oskar is so interested in this image?
  • What has fallen/is falling in this novel so far?

3. Watching part of the award-winning documentary, The Falling Man with a focus on the big picture (click HERE for the guiding questions given in class)


HW:
1. Bring your journal to class each day.

2. First reading assignment: Extremely Loud and Incredibly ClosePages 35-85 for THURSDAY. You will have 30 minutes on Monday and 30 minutes on Wednesday to read. Like hearing the book out loud? Click HERE to hear it on audiobook.com (first book is free).

3. First memoir assignment: Next Friday (Sep 23), bring in a collection of items that have significance to you (ticket stubs, printed photos, hospital ID bracelet, etc.).

Monday, September 19, 2016

Directions to Where Thomas Lives: September 19, 2016

Focus: How do we make sense of this novel's different narrative voices?

1. Warming up with finishing Thomas' narrative

If Thomas is giving us directions to where he lives...
  • What surprises you about his chapter?
  • What patterns do you notice in his narrative?
  • What adjective would you use to describe him?

2. Tapping into the mathematical part of your brain with a Venn diagram
  • Where do Oskar and Thomas overlap? Where do they differ?
3. Offering you an overview of the journal; giving you time to read and start your journal



4. Signing up for discussions of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

HW:
1. Bring your journal to class each day.

2. First reading assignment: Extremely Loud and Incredibly ClosePages 35-85 for THURSDAY. You will have 30 minutes on Monday and 30 minutes on Wednesday to read. Like hearing the book out loud? Click HERE to hear it on audiobook.com (first book is free).

3. First memoir assignment: Next Friday (Sep 23), bring in a collection of items that have significance to you (ticket stubs, printed photos, hospital ID bracelet, etc.).

My first item: 

Friday, September 16, 2016

Friday Freewrite: September 16, 2016

Focus: How do we start writing memoir?

Please turn in your printed essays with the purple checklist stapled to the front. If you have not yet printed yours, you have until 3:00 pm to turn this in. 

1. Warming up with Friday Freewrite #1:  "Directions to Where I Live"
  • Exploring a few student samples (printed copies only)
  • Writing your own
2. Understanding what memoir is and how it works in this class; click HERE for the overview.

3.  Returning to Thomas's narrative: How does it overlap with Oskar's?
  • What directions have these two narrators given us to where they live?
HW:
1. If you have not yet acquired a journal, make sure you get one by Monday and bring it to class. Select one that suits your tastes.

2. First reading assignment: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close: Pages 35-85 for THURSDAY. You will have 30 minutes on Monday and 30 minutes on Wednesday to read.

3. First memoir assignment: Next Friday (Sep 23), bring in a collection of items that have significance to you (ticket stubs, printed photos, hospital ID bracelet, etc.).


Thursday, September 15, 2016

Figuring Out Our First Two Narrative Voices: September 15, 2016

Focus: What background do we need to understand our first two narrators?

1. Warming up by catching up (10 minutes):
  • If you're not quite to page 15, please use these 10 minutes to get there as best you can.
  • If you haven't yet generated a list of questions and inferences about Oskar, please do so now.
  • If you got it all done yesterday, please skip to #3 on today's agenda and start perusing OR visit Autism Speaks to see if it helps you understand Oskar.

2. Playing "Save the Last Line" to start figuring out Oskar's narrative

Round 1: One question (What are you wondering?)

Round 2: One line (Which sentence or two caught your attention?)

Round 3: One inference (What ideas about Oskar are starting to form in your mind?)


3. Discovering background on Dresden; using a Venn diagram to consider 9/11 and Dresden side-by-side

  • Click HERE to read about the bombing of Dresden.
  • Click HERE for before and after pictures of Dresden (before the bombing and after).
  • Click HERE to read a survivor's story (he was a POW in Dresden at the time).
  • Click HERE to read another survivor's story (this one was a child at the time).
  • Click HERE to watch an interview with a Dresden survivor (contains war footage).


4. Reading aloud Thomas's narrative (he's a Dresden survivor)

As we read...
  • What are you learning about Thomas?
  • What are you wondering?
After we read...
  • How do Oskar's and Thomas' narratives relate?
HW:
1. Continue working on your drafts. You will walk into class this Friday, Sep 16 with a hard copy of your final draft in your hands, and we also discuss publication options at this time. Please continue showing up for your conferences. Click HERE for the online version of the Thursday night checklist.


2. New: Find a journal that suits your personality. Leather-bound classic? Sketchbook? Graphing paper notebook? Start bringing it to class ASAP. 

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

What The? Oskar's Voice: September 14, 2016

Focus: What the? What are we learning about Oskar, our unusual narrator?

PLC: Shortened Class Today

1. Warming up with reading Oskar's narrative; try to get to page 15, and generate a list of questions and inferences about Oskar (sticky notes or Google doc--up to you)

2. Exploring Autism Speaks
  • Do you have any personal experience with and/or background knowledge of autism?
  • What are some of your take-aways from this website? What are you learning?
  • Many readers have diagnosed Oskar with autism even though this is never clearly established in the book. To what extent do you agree with this? Does it help you understand Oskar, or is it unnecessary? Explain your thinking a bit.
  • Optional: Click here to read a review that claims the film version of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close discriminates against those with autism.

3. If time allows: Figuring out Oskar with "Save the Last Line"

Round 1: One question

Round 2: One line

Round 3: One inference


4. Offering you the Thursday night checklist on your way out (also attached HERE and under tonight's homework.

HW:
1. Continue working on your drafts. You will walk into class this Friday, Sep 16 with a hard copy of your final draft in your hands, and we also discuss publication options at this time. Please continue showing up for your conferences. Click HERE for a sneak peak of the Thursday night checklist.

Also, if you received partial credit on your rough draft and would like to receive full credit, finish your draft and e-mail me by 11:59 pm tonight.

2. New: Find a journal that suits your personality. Leather-bound classic? Sketchbook? Graphing paper notebook? Start bringing it to class on Thursday. Sep 15. 



Tuesday, September 13, 2016

9/11: Shattering and Rebuilding: September 13, 2016

Focus: What story of 9/11 can we learn from the images and voices from that time?

1. Warming up with Time Magazine's Photoessay: "Shattered"
  • New Google Folder: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (inside 1st Semester)
  • New Document: In-Class Thoughts (inside Extremely Loud...folder)
Take your time on these photos; if there are some too difficult to look at, move to the next one.

Get inside a photo: Select one photo that resonates with you. Spend some time describing it, imagining that you are the photographer. What are you trying to capture in this photo? What senses can you use to describe what's happening here? What's the tone, or emotion of this photo?

Step outside the photos: If this photoessay had a written thesis, what do you think it would be? What story do they tell about 9/11?

Face the book: The main narrator of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is Oskar. He's nine years old, and he has just lost his father to the 9/11 attacks. Based on the photos you've just spend time with, what three adjectives might you use to describe Oskar's state of mind?

2. Spending ten minutes listening to voices of resilience; click here for their stories, to be followed by small group discussions:

  • What were your takeaways from these videos? What specific things struck you?
  • What do you make of the cover of this book and the title page? Can you make some connections between what you've learned/seen today and the design of the title?

3. Flipping through the book: Throughout the book, you'll find items from Oskar's journal (photos, business cards, magazine clippings, letters, etc.). As you look through his journal items, try to make inferences about Oskar (you can just do this on your Google doc). In other words, what educated guesses can you make about Oskar based on what he puts in his journal? What questions do you have?

4. Starting to read the first pages ("What the?"): Continue adding to your list of inferences and questions about Oskar. I don't yet recommend going beyond page 15.

HW:
1. Continue working on your drafts. You will walk into class next Friday, Sep 16 with a hard copy of your final draft in your hands, and we also discuss publication options at this time. Please continue showing up for your conferences. Click HERE for a sneak peak of the Thursday night checklist.

Also, if you received partial credit on your rough draft and would like to receive full credit, finish your draft and e-mail by 11:59 pm Wednesday night.

2. By the end of class tomorrow, we will be through page 15 of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. No need to read tonight unless you fell behind in class today or were absent.

3. New: Find a journal that suits your personality. Leather-bound classic? Sketchbook? Graphing paper notebook? Start bringing it to class on Thursday. Sep 15. 

Monday, September 12, 2016

Revising for Style: September 12, 2016

Focus: How can I strengthen the style of my essay?

Housekeeping Items:

  • My feedback on your drafts is in all-caps. I apologize if it feels like I'm yelling at you.
  • If your draft was not complete at the time I assessed it, you can complete it by midnight on Wednesday for credit; be sure to e-mail me. (After that, it's a final draft, for which you will receive a separate grade).
  • Friday is the deadline for the final draft. It must be printed. If you are absent Friday, your final draft should still be in your Google folder, and you will bring a printed copy on Monday.


1. Warming up with ye ole Puritan words: Can you replace two of your words with Puritan lingo?

2. Offering you a top-secret packet; success guaranteed!

3. Trading essays and peer editing for grammar and style

Round 1: Grammar Police
  • Check for comma/punctuation issues with a read aloud.
  • Check for capitalization errors.
  • Check for misspelled words that autocorrect won't fix (such as "affect" vs. "effect").
  • Check for run-on sentences and sentence fragments.
  • Anything else?

Round 2: Word Choice Cowboys (click HERE for slides and scroll to Slide 27)

4. Playing around with sentence variety using SAS Writer Reviser (also linked to my website)
  • Log in (with Google account)
  • Launch Resource
  • Create Essay (copy and paste)

HW:
1. Continue working on your drafts. You will walk into class next Friday, Sep 16 with a hard copy of your final draft in your hands, and we also discuss publication options at this time. Please continue showing up for your conferences. Click HERE for a sneak peak of the Thursday night checklist.

2. If you have a copy of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, start bringing it on Tuesday.

3. New: Find a journal that suits your personality. Leather-bound classic? Sketchbook? Graphing paper notebook? Start bringing it to class on Thursday. Sep 15. 

Friday, September 9, 2016

Revising for Content: September 9, 2016

Focus: How do we strengthen the content of our essays?

1. Warming up with the ground rules of peer editing

  • Rule #1: Be honest, but kind. Build trust.
  • Rule #2: The first eight minutes at each station will be quiet; the last two minutes will be for talking about your feedback.
  • Rule #3: Phrase your feedback in a way that suggests what the author can/should try (rather than criticizing them for failures).
  • Rule #4: Follow the steps carefully. There are only ten minutes at each station; work efficiently.
  • Rule #5: Be generous with your feedback.

2. Rotating between the five editing stations

3. Wrapping up with goals for the weekend

HW:
1. Revise your essays based on today's peer feedback. You will want an updated draft on Monday for our final editing day on style.

2. We will begin Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close next Tuesday; if you have your own copy, start bringing it to class then.

3. Contact me if you need help!

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Styling Up Your Opening and Closing Arguments: September 8, 2016

Focus: How do we open and close our essays in a compelling way?

Reminder: Today is the last day for drafting in class.

1. Warming up with a goal and a little image-inspired creative writing

2. Writing what you really want to get across in your intro and/or conclusion
  • Roaming around in a quick gallery walk of each other's ideas and images
  • Taking your creative writing skills and showing them off in your introduction and/or conclusion

3. Reminding you of your class guidelines as a source for great ideas for your introduction and conclusion

4. Drafting and conferencing, drafting and conferencing

5. Posting on today's class blog one thing you want addressed during peer-editing on Friday and Monday.

HW:
1. The complete rough draft is due before class TOMORROW, Friday, Sep 9.
  • We will publish your final drafts in class on Friday, Sep 16.

2. If you haven't yet done so, please sign up for a conference by clicking here.

3. Wanna buy Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close? There's still time! We start next Tue.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Making Your Case: September 7, 2016

Focus: How do we use evidence to make our case?

1. Warming up with suspicious objects and using them to make a strong case

  • The crime: The portable classroom has been stolen.
  • The primary suspect: Ms. Leclaire
  • The only piece of evidence: The utensil on your desk


2. Offering you a brief mini lesson on using lead-outs to make your case (click HERE for slides)
  • Taking the blank sheet of paper challenge with one of your numbers and one of your quotations.
3. Drafting and conferencing, drafting and conferencing

P.S. If you're needing more help with yesterday's lesson on lead-ins, click here for a student sample from last year with amazing lead-ins (highlighted for you).

HW:
1. By tomorrow, your body paragraphs should be largely completed. We will have some fun with introductions and conclusions in class tomorrow. 
  • The complete rough draft is due before class this Friday, Sep 9.
  • We will publish your final drafts in class on Friday, Sep 16.

2. If you haven't yet done so, please sign up for a conference by clicking here.

3. Wanna buy Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close? There's still time! We start in one week.


Tuesday, September 6, 2016

You've Been Drafted: September 6, 2016

Focus: What do we need to build a draft?

1. Warming up with a sample essay; does it meet our class-generated class guidelines?
  • Paragraph by paragraph, highlight which techniques from our guidelines this writer uses.
  • Line by line, talk through what one body paragraph does.
2. Offering you a brief mini lesson on using evidence: quoting, paraphrasing, and leading in (click HERE for the slides)

3. Using your annotated bibliographies for your cited evidence

Option 1: Try making a comment on each statistic/quotation/fact you might bring in.
  • Will it be in quotations or paraphrased? 
  • Are there any areas where you need to do some more research? Make yourself a note.
Option 2: Copy and paste directly into your outline or draft
  • Either paraphrase or leave in quotations. 
  • Go ahead and CITE it right now (will save you time later).
3. Drafting, drafting, drafting with a focus on using and leading into your evidence

HW:
1. By tomorrow, you should have at least one page of your draft completed. The complete draft is due before class this Friday.

2. If you haven't yet done so, please sign up for a conference by clicking here.

3. Wanna buy Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close? There's still time! We start in one week.


Friday, September 2, 2016

Solidifying Your Structure: Sep 2, 2016

Focus: How do I build a strong foundation for my essay?


1. Warming up: In small groups, form some class guidelines for the essay.

2. Thinking about the next best step for YOU--how might you find your way into this essay?

Option 1: Adding more reflection to your annotated bibliography/thinking through your research more critically/color coding your research until patterns emerge

Option 2: Typing a formal outline

Option 3: Drafting--start with your favorite part (intro? body paragraph?)

3. Sharing ideas and offering feedback

4. Returning to your essay with a few new ideas

HW:
1. Spend 30-60 minutes with this over the long weekend. On Tuesday, we all need to be in the drafting phase. By next Friday, Sep 9, you will need a complete draft.

2. Click HERE for a conference sign-up. Everyone needs to conference with me at least once; you can conference during the early drafting stages, the later drafting stages, or after the final draft is due. Think about at point in your writing routine you need the most one-on-one help.

3.  If it's in your budget or on your bookshelf, please acquire your own copy of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer. We will start this book in about a week.


Thursday, September 1, 2016

Making a Thesis: September 1, 2016

Focus: How do we develop a routine for building a structurally sound thesis?

Look over your annotated bibliography, form  Level 3 question, and write it on your dry erase tape.

My ex: Why is paranoia contagious?

1. Warming up with literal and metaphorical building
  • Build a boat. What's the most important part about the structure of a boat?
  • Build a tree. What's the most important part about the structure of a tree?
  • Build a house. What's the most part about the structure of a house?
  • Build an essay. What's the most important part about the structure of an essay?

2. Taking your ideas and figuring out how to build them into a structurally sound essay (in small groups of people whose topics are similar to yours)

  • Fill all of your Legos except for one with your most significant findings.
  • Help each other find structures for building an essay.
    • Which ideas might go together in the same paragraph? Put them in the same part of the structure.
    • Which ideas branch off each other?

3. Making your thesis: Looking at your structure, develop a thesis that makes an argument, possibly by answering the question on your dry erase tape, and lays out the overall structure.

My Level 3 question from yesterday: Why is paranoia contagious?

My rough thesis: The events of Y2K expose that paranoia is most contagious when it's rooted in dependence on technology and fear of poverty.

  • Write this thesis on your remaining Lego, put it at the base of your structure (or wherever you think it makes sense), and take a picture. There's your outline.

HW:
1. If you haven't finished a rough draft of your thesis, please finish. If you prefer to have a typed, more detailed outline, please complete that tonight. If you prefer to start drafting, then start drafting. TOMORROW YOU SHOULD WALK IN KNOWING YOUR THESIS AND WHAT YOU WILL TALK ABOUT IN EACH OF YOUR BODY PARAGRAPHS.

2. Click HERE for a conference sign-up. Everyone needs to conference with me at least once; you can conference during the early drafting stages, the later drafting stages, or after the final draft is due. Think about at point in your writing routine you need the most one-on-one help.

3.  If it's in your budget or on your bookshelf, please acquire your own copy of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.