Monday, October 31, 2016

Poe's Inner and Outer Landscapes: October 31, 2016

Focus: What does Poe teach us about our inner and outer landscapes?

1. Warming up by taking a Freudian self-quiz

2. Unraveling Gothic Mystery #2: Repression

3. Trying out a psychoanalytical approach to "The Tell-Tale Heart"; use today's lesson to guide you as you work through the story with your Gothic journal

4. Optional: Viewing the spookiest Gothic man of all time: David S. Pumpkins

HW:
1. Bring index cards to class on Friday; we will do some brainstorming for your big speech and develop some itty bitty warm-ups.

2. Continue working on your ELIC-inspired memoir. All rough drafts should now have my feedback. 
Final drafts are due November 1 by 3:00 pm (I extended the deadline by one day).
We will be submitting them www.turnitin.com, so no need to print.
Also, this Friday, be prepared to share one line, a few lines, or a paragraph from your memoir.

3. If you wish to revise the content of your cultural hysteria essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. 
All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.






Friday, October 28, 2016

Delivering a Powerful Speech: October 28, 2016

Focus: What skills do we need to start working on NOW to deliver a powerful speech later?

1. Warming up: Using the speech rubric to identify your strengths, weaknesses, and questions as a presenter

There is a blank ( ___ ) next to each specific component of the speech rubric. Think about presentations you've given in the past, and assess your skills:
  • Put a (+) next to skills you do well.
  • Put a (-) next to skills you hope to develop.
  • Put a (?) next to skills you don't quite understand.
  • Ex:

2. Plugging into Ted Talks (20 min):
  • On your own, scroll through the topics and pick several Ted Talks to watch. You will have 20 minutes.
  • As you watch, fill in the second question on your speech overview
    • What makes a good speech for an audience? 
    • Consider the first thing a presenter says to an audience, as well as the last thing. Look at how they use media, how they stand, how they use their voices, etc. What works for you? 
    • Jot your ideas down on the brainstorming sheet as you watch.

3. Sharing your favorite TedTalks with your grid groups:
  • Pick ONE Ted Talk you watched (your personal favorite) and have the rest of your group watch at least 5 minutes of it. SAME GRID GROUPS AS YESTERDAY.
  • Then, using the back of yesterday's grids, discuss and record the following:
Topic #1: In terms of content, what made the Ted Talks you watched strong (or weak, or mediocre)? When we present at the end of the semester, what expectations should we set for content? What makes content interesting? What pitfalls should we avoid?

Topic #2: In terms of use of media (what's glowing on the slides in the background), what were effective uses of media in the Ted Talks? In speeches you've seen or given, what are some bad uses of media? When we present at the end of the semester, what expectations should we set for use of media? What pitfalls should we avoid?

Topic #3: In terms of delivery (voice, posture, pace, etc), what were some effective examples of delivery? What makes some people more engaging to listen to than others? When we present at the end of the semester, what expectations should we set for delivery? What pitfalls should we avoid?

Please turn in your grids to Mrs. Abner when you finish.

4. Wrapping up with an important exit ticket

HW:
1. Continue working on your ELIC-inspired memoir. All rough drafts should now have my feedback. If you'd like further feedback or a conference, please ask me by Wednesday afternoon.
Final drafts are due November 1 by 3:00 pm (I extended the deadline by one day).

2. If you wish to revise the content of your cultural hysteria essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. 
All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Investigating Poe's Style and Purpose: October 27, 2016

Focus: What does Poe want us to understand differently, and how is he revealing this to us?

1. Warming up with a Level 1 scavenger hunt
  • Please make a copy and save it in your Gothic Literature folder.
2. Discussing "Fall of the House of Usher" in grid groups to get to Level 2 and 3 thinking

Please bring in quotations from the story as you discuss (and note them in your grids).

Topic #1: In this story, what do the characters fear? What do they do to feel safe? Does it work?

Topic #2: Poe wrote "The Fall of the House of Usher" during a time of shift in the United States. The aristocracy (the upper, upper class), which depended on the oppression of lower classes and on the preservation of "pure, royal blood," was crumbling and giving rise to the middle class. How does this 19th century historical tension relate to the story? What multiple meanings might the title of the story hold?

Topic #3: What does this story help us understand about fear? American society? Human nature? 

3. Introducing the speech component of American Literature

HW:
1. Bring headphones to class tomorrow.

2. Make sure that your Gothic journal is complete and inside your Gothic Literature folder.

3. Continue working on your ELIC-inspired memoir. All rough drafts should now have my feedback. If you'd like further feedback or a conference, please ask me by Wednesday afternoon.
Final drafts are due November 1 by 3:00 pm (I extended the deadline by one day).

4. If you wish to revise the content of your cultural hysteria essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. 
All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.


Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Watching the House Fall: October 26, 2016

Focus: Why and how does the house of Usher fall?

1. Warming up with your subject-verb agreement "quiz"

2. Talking through the Gothic reading journal

3. Reading (and perhaps listening to) "The Fall of the House of Usher" with your reading journal

4. Completing an exit ticket about why/how the house of Usher is falling

HW:
1. Finish reading "Fall of the House of Usher" and complete your Gothic journal entry; make sure this is inside your "Gothic Literature" folder so I may give you credit and feedback. NOW DUE THURSDAY (BEFORE CLASS).

2. Continue working on your ELIC-inspired memoir. All rough drafts should now have my feedback. If you'd like further feedback or a conference, please ask me by Wednesday afternoon.
Final drafts are due November 1 by 3:00 pm (I extended the deadline by one day).

3. If you wish to revise the content of your cultural hysteria essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. 
All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Entering Usher's House: October 25, 2016

Focus: What does the Gothic house reveal about its hosts and guests?




1. Warming up: Using Edgar Allan Poe's vocabulary to create a group scary story

2. Quickly reviewing yesterday's Gothic mystery with a wider focus:

In American Gothic texts so far, how would you characterize the purpose of the house?

3. Applying yesterday's Gothic mystery to the beginning of "The Fall of the House of Usher"; you may use your "Gothic Mystery #1" notes to analyze this, or if you're the artistic sort, you can draw the house, the host,  and the guest as you listen

4. Offering you the Gothic journal (also linked to the website)

5. Giving you time to read/listen "Fall of the House of Usher" as you analyze the relationship between the house, its host(s), and its guest (the narrator)

HW:
1. Finish reading "Fall of the House of Usher" and complete your Gothic journal entry; make sure this is inside your "Gothic Literature" folder so I may give you credit and feedback. NOW DUE THURSDAY (BEFORE CLASS).

2. Continue working on your ELIC-inspired memoir. All rough drafts should now have my feedback. If you'd like further feedback or a conference, please ask me by Wednesday afternoon.
Final drafts are due November 1 by 3:00 pm (I extended the deadline by one day).

3. If you wish to revise the content of your cultural hysteria essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. 
All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.

4. Heads-up: On Wednesday, we will have a "quiz" on subject-verb agreement. You don't need to study for this as it is open-note, open-friend, and open-teacher.

Monday, October 24, 2016

Entering the Gothic House: October 24, 2016

Focus: What background should we build in order to understand American Gothic literature?


(image from https://www.thinglink.com)

1. Warming up: Playing musical chairs with Gothic topics

2. Making predictions about the Gothic stories with the quotation on the front of your booklet:

  • By yourself: What does this quotation mean? Do a little bubble brainstorming or freewriting to unpack it.
  • With a partner: How does this quotation connect to any or all of the brainstorming you did during musical chairs? What topics do you think we're likely to find in these Gothic stories?

3. Taking a time-out to explore how this unit will work and to set up your folders:
  • Create a folder called "Gothic Literature" (or something of that nature).
  • Place it inside your shared American Literature folder.
  • Click HERE for Gothic Mystery #1; make a copy, and save it inside your Gothic Literature folder.

4. Investigating Gothic Mystery #1: What is the role of the Gothic house?

The Others: 0-10:00
Edward Scissorhands: 7:55-16:30

5. Wrapping up with an exit ticket

HW:
1. Continue working on your ELIC-inspired memoir. All rough drafts should now have my feedback. If you'd like further feedback or a conference, please ask me by Wednesday afternoon.
Final drafts are due November 1 by 3:00 pm (I extended the deadline by one day).

2. If you wish to revise the content of your cultural hysteria essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. 
All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.

3. Heads up: We will begin reading "The Fall of the House of Usher" in class tomorrow, and the homework will be to finish it and the journal (linked here and on website) by Wednesday.

4. One more heads-up: On Wednesday, we will have a "quiz" on subject-verb agreement. You don't need to study for this as it is open-note, open-friend, and open-teacher.




Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Tying Up Loose Ends: October 19, 2016

Focus: What loose ends do you need to tie up before the long weekend?

Option 1: Grammar fixes for your cultural hysteria essays are due today (click here for directions). If yours aren't finished, use your class time today to wrap it up.

Option 2: Draft and structure your memoirs. These aren't due until October 31, but here are two things to keep in mind:
  • You will not have further class time to work on these. From here on out, it's up to you to draft and conference with me. I will be leaving you feedback this weekend.
  • I will be on our first family vacation ever from Oct 28-30 and will not be able to help you then. In other words, if you need help, you need to seek it at the beginning of next week, not the end.

Option 3: Sit back, relax, and enjoy the film ending of Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.

PLEASE TURN IN YOUR JOURNALS AND YELLOW SHEETS BY THE END OF CLASS IF YOU HAVE NOT YET CONFERENCED WITH ME.

HW:
1. If you wish to revise the content of your essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.

2. Optional (but encouraged): Sign up for a memoir conference by clicking HERE. Final memoirs due Oct 31 by 3:00 pm. These will be submitted electronically to www.turnitin.com rather than printed (we'll go over how to do this in class).


PLEASE REMIND YOUR PARENTS THAT I WILL ONLY BE AT CONFERENCES BETWEEN 3:00 AND 5:30. 

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Shaping Your Memoirs: October 18, 2016

Focus: How do we finding meaning and shape in our memoirs?

1. Warming up with a little math and in-class focus and effort goals

2. Returning to memoir writing and considering your narrative arc
  • Trying it out with Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
  • Making sure you've chosen your memoir and labeled it "READ THIS ONE"
  • Shaping your memoir using the narrative arc; figuring out which scenes still need to be written
    • Try to identify your turning point first; the rest of the arc will fall into place.

3. Continuing to structure and draft your memoir/conferencing on your ELIC journals

4. Collecting journals and yellow sheets from people I haven't conferenced with yet

PLEASE TURN IN YOUR JOURNALS AND YELLOW SHEETS BY THE END OF CLASS IF YOU HAVE NOT YET CONFERENCED WITH ME.

HW:
1. Please finish your grammar fixes tomorrow. You don't need to print them; you can just put them in your grammar folder. (See above if you need an example.) If you wish to revise the content of your essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.

2. Optional (but encouraged): Sign up for a memoir conference by clicking HERE. Final memoirs due Oct 31 by 3:00 pm. These will be submitted electronically to www.turnitin.com rather than printed (we'll go over how to do this in class).

PLEASE REMIND YOUR PARENTS THAT I WILL ONLY BE AT CONFERENCES BETWEEN 3:00 AND 5:30. 

Monday, October 17, 2016

Building the Foundation: October 17, 2016

Focus: What foundations do we need to build for strong writing?

1. Warming up with Grammar Rule You Must Know #1: Subject-Verb Agreement
  • Make yourself a grammar folder, and place it inside your American Lit folder.
  • Click HERE, make a copy, call it "Subject-Verb Agreement," and put it inside your grammar folder.
2. Investigating your personal grammar pitfalls from your cultural hysteria essays; starting on your grammar fixes and setting content goals
  • Read over the feedback. Then, at the end of your essay, summarize one or two things you did well and one or two things to work on.
  • Click HERE for a sample "Grammar Fix."
  • You will get to use this essay as a "cheat sheet" on the timed writing at the end of the gothic unit.
3. Returning to memoir writing and considering your narrative arc

HW:
1. Please finish your grammar fixes by this Wednesday. You don't need to print them; you can just put them in your grammar folder. (See above if you need an example.) If you wish to revise the content of your essay (not just the grammar), you must conference with me. All revisions must be submitted by November 11, which is the end of 12 weeks.

2. Optional (but encouraged): Sign up for a memoir conference by clicking HERE. Final memoirs due Oct 31 by 3:00 pm. These will be submitted electronically to www.turnitin.com rather than printed (we'll go over how to do this in class).

3. IF YOU HAVE NOT CONFERENCED WITH ME ON YOUR JOURNAL, YOU MUST BRING IT TO CLASS TOMORROW WITH YOUR YELLOW SHEET.





Friday, October 14, 2016

Friday Freewrite: October 14, 2016

Focus: How do we find epiphanies through writing memoir?

How are you feeling today?

1. Warming up by rereading 312-314 in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
  • What does the Grandmother put in reverse?
  • Why do you think she's putting this in reverse?
  • What epiphany does she have by writing events in reverse?
  • How would you describe her tone? Click HERE for complex tone words.
2. Engaging in Memoir Writing, Day 4: Click HERE for slides.

3. Looking through your memoir writing and labeling your favorite one "READ THIS ONE"; reading the final memoir guidelines by clicking HERE

HW:
1. If I haven't conferenced with you yet on your reading journal, keep bringing it to class; conferences will continue next week.

2. If you didn't have time to pick your favorite memoir piece and label it "READ THIS ONE," please do so by Monday. If you want to conference on the rough draft of your memoir, sign up for a conference by clicking HERE. If you'd prefer written feedback, then you do not need a conference.


MEMOIR FINAL DRAFTS ARE DUE OCTOBER 31, 2016

Thursday, October 13, 2016

The Resolution of Reverse: October 13, 2016

Focus: What does Foer want us to understand better/differently from the ending of his novel?

1. Warming up with World War II in Reverse and your emotional response to the novel's ending

  • As you watch: Which images stand out to you? What's it like to watch a war in reverse?
  • After you watch: Reread the ending of Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, starting on page 325. What effect did these final pages and images have on you? How do these final pages connect to the video you just watched?


2. Considering the final stage of the archetypal hero's journey and your intellectual response to the novel's ending



In the final stage of the hero's journey, the hero returns home, but he has gained a new understanding of the world around him. He can no longer live in fear of the future nor regret over the past. 
  • To what extent does Oskar (or the grandmother or grandfather) fulfill the final stage of the hero's journey? 
  • In other words, how does he return home? What's his new understanding of things? To what extent has he confronted his fear of the future/regret over the past? Why does Foer put the ending in reverse?

3. Enjoying our final fishbowl discussion of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close: Page 307-end

4. Wrapping up with our responses to the focus question

HW:
1. By tomorrow: Revisit the Time page linked HERE that we explored on the first day of this unit. Watch two or three more interviews (or re-watch ones that you liked). Make a final entry in your journal about what new understanding you've gained from reading this book about 9/11, loss, survival, strength, or any other topic that surfaces in these interviews.

2. If I haven't conferenced with you yet on your reading journal, keep bringing it to class; conferences will continue tomorrow and next week.


Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Uncovering Patterns and Themes: October 12, 2016

Focus: What are Foer's central motifs, and how does he use them to reveal larger themes?

1. Warming up by generating a class list of Foer's motifs (patterns)
  • 1st row: Book cover, images and unusual pages
  • 2nd row: Fishbowl comments from first three discussions
  • 3rd row: Fishbowl comments from the last two discussions
  • 4th row: 4th hour syllabi
  • 5th row: 6th hour syllabi
  • 6th row: Your journals
2. Working in small groups to unpack the patterns and lay out the themes
  • Pick your 5-10 of your favorite motifs.
  • Create a concept map that visually shows how these motifs relate to each other.
  • Please include quotations in your concept map to keep it connected to the text.
  • Things to consider:
    • What do these motifs have in common? How do they connect?
    • What larger, complex idea is Foer trying to get us to understand better or differently through these motifs? 

3. Final day for reading, conferencing, and journaling

HW:
1. By tomorrow: Finish the book, Finish your journal. Feel like a rock star. 

2. By Friday: Revisit the Time page linked HERE that we explored on the first day of this unit. Watch two or three more interviews (or re-watch ones that you liked). Make a final entry in your journal about what new understanding you've gained from reading this book about 9/11, loss, survival, strength, or any other topic that surfaces in these interviews.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Dark Matter: October 11, 2016

Focus: What do Foer's characters fear? What do they do to feel safe?

1. Warming up with puzzling together the motif of "black"

Round 1: Put a sticky note on page 284. Hold it close. Hold it far away. What does it look like? Find a quotation from this chapter that you think explains somewhat why this page looks this way.

Round 2: Put a sticky note on page 305. Reread Stephen Hawking's letter. Use his letter to add to the answer from Round 1.

Round 3: Everyone Oskar visited on his quest had the last name "Black." Foer could have chosen any name in the universe, but he chose to repeat the name "Black." How does this connect to the answers for Rounds 1 and 2?

Round 4: Put a sticky note on page 318. Flip back and forth between page 284, page 305, and page 318. Read over the answers to Rounds 1, 2, and 3. Then make a thematic statement: What do you think Foer is up to with the concept of "Black"?

2. Enjoying our penultimate fishbowl discussion: ELIC, pages 260-306

3. Wrapping up with takeaways (for an extra challenge, work in a new tone word)

HW:
Finish the book. Finish your journal. Feel accomplished. 

Monday, October 10, 2016

Name that Tone: October 10, 2016

Focus: What complex tone does Foer develop throughout the novel? How?

1. Warming up with Name that Tone (click HERE for tone vocabulary)
  • How are you feeling today? 
  • Taking the Emoji Test.
2. Bringing it back to Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
  • Pick your favorite Oskar chapter. Highlight or type TEN words or phrases that reveal emotion. 
  • Ex: "Reads in Dad's voice" "I could fall asleep" "it would sound like war" "I'm still wearing heavy boots" "a whole dead world could be underneath the living one" "things are extremely complicated" "if I could make him crack up, my boots would be a little lighter" "Is no clues a clue?" "What the?" "It was a message to me!" "I looked at the called ID and saw that it was him"
  • Put them together like puzzle pieces to figure out the underlying tone: Which tone words most accurately capture this chapter?
  • Tone words: Oskar shows candor, dismay, and ambition in the first chapter.
OR
  • Pick your favorite Thomas chapter and do the same.
OR
  • Pick your favorite Grandmother chapter ("My Feelings") and do the same.
3. Reading, journaling, and conferencing

4. Composing an exit ticket to reflect (which I will share with tomorrow's leaders)

HW:
Read through page 306 for tomorrow; FINISH the book and your journal by Thursday.



Friday, October 7, 2016

The Film Interpretation: October 7, 2016

Focus: What does the film adaptation help you understand differently?

Say hello to Mrs. Friis! During the film, please remember to use the yellow sheet to think through the choices the film makes in its treatment of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.

Also, movie rule #1: No talking during the movie. 

1. Attendance: Please make sure you are in your assigned seat.

2. Viewing the film and filling out the film interpretation form

3. Turning in your yellow forms to Mrs. Friis

HW: 
1. Read pages 260-306 in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; in your 30 minutes of journal time, start trying to put together larger patterns and themes (16 pages of tonight's reading are images or otherwise weird pages).

2. We will continue with journal conferences on Monday.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Oskar's Inventions: October 6, 2016

Focus: What do Oskar's inventions reveal about his quest?

1. Warming up with Oskar's inventions:

(a) Make a page in your journal to generate a list Oskar's inventions.


Pages I found with Oskar's inventions (I may have missed a few): 
1, 3, 35, 38, 72, 73-4, 217-223 (the "Sixth Borough is really Oskar's dad's invention, but it works), 235, 250, 258-9

Oskar tells the renter, "I want to stop inventing. If I could know how he died, exactly how he died, I wouldn't have to invent him dying inside an elevator that was stuck between floors, which happened to some people, and I wouldn't have to imagine him trying to crawl down the outside of the building, which I saw a video of one person doing on a Polish site, or trying to use a tablecloth as a parachute, like some of the people who were in Windows on the World actually did. There were so many different ways to die, and I just need to know which was his" 
(Foer 257).

(b) According to Oskar's statement above, why has Oskar been inventing? Why does he want to stop?

(c) Pick two or three of Oskar's inventions that interest you. How do they relate to your answer to question (b)?


2. Taking your second musical stroll of the week:
  • Read what they wrote and say hello.
  • Ask a Level 1, 2 or 3 question about something they wrote (something you'd genuinely like answered). 
AND/OR
  • Offer a meaningful reflection on something they wrote.
3. Enjoying Fishbowl Discussion #4: Pages 208-259

FISHBOWL REMINDERS:

I have two note-takers assigned today. Please post notes on the class blog and give discussion map to Mrs. Hancock when you're done.

Four of you have specific outer circle roles. Do them justice!!!

Remember the idea is to leave with a stronger understanding of the chapter than you came in with. Bounce ideas back and forth on both circles (don't settle for the "one and done").

HW:
1. Your penultimate reading assignment, pages 260-306 is due Tuesday. Let's do this. (If you're feeling daunted by the # of pages, don't be--many of the pages are weird).

2. Reading conferences will continue next Monday and Wednesday.



NY Landmarks: October 5, 2016

Focus: What role does the New York landscape play in this part of the novel?

PLC: Shortened Class Today

Note to self: In 6th hour, assign note-takers and other fun fishbowl roles.

1. Warming up with a map of NY's boroughs, and image of Central Park, and a virtual tour of the Empire State building

The Boroughs

Central Park

Making Predictions:

  • Why might Foer include a chapter about an imaginary 6th borough?
  • Why might the Empire State Building symbolize in the story?

2. Reading, journaling, and conferencing
  • What does the idea of the 6th borough represent to Oskar? (Revisit the image on pages 60 and 61 after you read that part)
  • What symbolic role does the Empire State Building play in this part of the story?
3. Writing a quick exit ticket by clicking here

HW:
1. Read pages 208-259 for tomorrow in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; spend 30 minutes this week with your journal.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. 

2. We will continue our READING JOURNAL CONFERENCES in class next week. Click HERE for the rubric. 

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

(Le)clarification: October 4, 2016

Focus: What mysteries are starting to reveal themselves, and which are still unsolved?

1. Warming up: Trying to discern what's becoming clearer and what's becoming cloudier

  • Track some things you understand in a new way/you understand better from pages 174-20.7
  • Track some things you feel confused about/would like to understand more clearly.



2. Strolling around in a gallery walk and silent clarification (or at least, empathy)

  • What confusion can you clear up for other people?
  • Which questions did you have, too?

3. Enjoying Fishbowl Discussion #5: Pages 174-207


HW:
1. Read pages 208-259 for Thursday in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; spend 30 minutes this week with your journal.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. 

2. We will continue our READING JOURNAL CONFERENCES in class tomorrow and next week. Click HERE for the rubric. 



Monday, October 3, 2016

People Who Share the Last Name, "Black": October 3, 2016

Focus: What role do the minor characters play in Oskar's journey?

1. Warming up with some visits to everyone named "Black":
  • Flip through Oskar's chapters and list everyone he's visited so far named "Black."
  • For each person, write one word that indicates your initial perception or Oskar's first impression of this character.
  • Then cross it out, and write down your final perception or Oskar's shifted impression of this character.

2. Combining partnerships to form groups of four and compare answers
  • Why is each Black significant to Oskar's journey? What does each one help him question or understand differently?
  • What do all of the Blacks have in common? 

3. Reading, journaling, and conferencing with Ms. Leclaire on Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close


Possible journal focus (if you need one): Look at the new Blacks Oskar meets and consider what impact their encounters have on Oskar. How do they help him on his quest?


HW:
1. Read pages 174-207 for tomorrow in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; spend 30 minutes this week with your journal.

If you miss a Fishbowl or Socratic, you must make it up. Read over the syllabus and blog comments, then add an extended comment to the class blog. 

2. We will continue our READING JOURNAL CONFERENCES in class next Wednesday. Click HERE for the rubric.